El País Planeta Futuro

Spain

Description

El País is the highest-circulation daily newspaper in Spain. It was founded in 1976 and today its headquarters and central editorial staff are located in Madrid, although there are regional offices in the principal Spanish cities where regional editions are produced. El País also produces a world edition that is printed and distributed in Latin America. El País set out to be a highly readable, serious, literate national newspaper appealing to diverse interests and schools of political thoughts. It covers local, national, and international news thoroughly and offers sections on culture and society, sports, business and finance. The appearance of the newspaper is characterised by its sobriety, in both its treatment of information and its aesthetics.

Affiliated grantees

Funded projects

Big Men

Big Men tells ​the stories of East Africa's unlikely feminists: men in Rwanda, Uganda and Kenya who are redefining masculinity and/or fighting for female empowerment.

Crossing The River

This interactive web documentary follows the struggle for life of three passionate female health workers in Sub-Saharan Africa, where maternal mortality registers the highest rates in the world.

With bare hands

“With bare hands” is a multimedia and data-driven reporting project that highlights and investigates the impact on the environment and the human costs of shipbreaking in developing countries.

Watergrabbing - A Story of Water

Watergrabbing explores the lack of water sovereignty and the limitation of access to water. It shows the consequences of these issues and the positive and negative practices.

Hunger for bees

Hunger for bees is a multimedia comic project about the decrease of the bee population and the possible repercussions on the global food system.

To be 70 in Addis and Dar-es-Salaam: ageing in Sub-Saharan Africa

This multimedia project presents stories on the fight against poverty and social exclusion among elderly people in Tanzania and Ethiopia.

Demal Te Niew (Go and come back)

Demal Te Niew is an interactive web-documentary on return migration between Italy and Senegal that aims to present an alternative perspective on migration through data-journalism and a multi-media storytelling strategy.

Agritools – Crowdsourcing Stories on ICT for Agriculture in Africa

The project will crowdsource and map African ICT for agriculture initiatives.

Lungs of the Earth

Lungs of the Earth is a data-driven, immersive and constructive story on forests, deforestation and reforestation around the world.

Wells of Tears – The Bangladesh Arsenic Project

Wells of Tears will tell the story of the mass arsenic poisoning in Bangladesh and explore solutions to this problem.

Slum No More

Slum No More describes the clash between local authorities wishing to upgrade an overcrowded slum into a modern neighborhood and the slum dwellers' hope for affordable housing

Invisible Killer

Invisible Killer is an interactive web documentary that tackles the issue of Tuberculosis and MultiDrugResistant TB, the second greatest killer worldwide and the leading cause of death in South Africa.

UNCUT

UNCUT is a web-documentary on female genital mutilations (FGM), with a data journalism survey through Africa and Europe. It narrates stories of women in Kenya, Somaliland, Ethiopia, where FGM has been fought hard—and successfully.

Building Urban Resilience

Through the case studies of Lagos and Dar es Salaam, this investigation looks behind the newly hyped phrase of 'resilience', and focuses on some of the dilemmas in different development strategies that aim to build resilience.

Small is Powerful

Small is Powerful (Les Grands Moyens in French) reveals the underrated impact of local Small & Medium Enterprises (SMEs) on Africa's development, showing that Africa is not only about microcredit and multinationals

The Formidable Queen Mothers of Ghana

Queen Mothers in Ghana have reclaimed and modernized their traditional role, bringing social and economic changes across the country. This story is about women leadership and ingenuity - of a little known, but remarkable institution.

Toilet for All

Over 2.8 billion people in the world lack access to proper sanitation, putting human security in jeopardy. This project highlights the impact of this human development failure in India and the Democratic Republic of Congo.

E-waste Republic

On the outskirts of Accra, Ghana, sits Agbogbloshie, a relevant dump of electronic waste in Africa. This data-driven project shows how a social enterprise is converting such e-waste into valuable products.

Fish for Cheap

The ocean off West Africa is a fertile ground for both European fleets and illegal trawlers. This project follows the entire fishing chain – from those affected locally to those consuming the catch in Europe.

Green Energy for the Giant of Africa

Green Energy for the Giant of Africa is a multimedia project on Nigeria's energy crisis and the role of renewable technologies to improve people's lives.

Boom and Bust on an Emerging Continent

Across Africa, boomtowns are increasingly emerging as hubs of African development. This story investigates if these towns are in fact unleashing Africa's potential and promote sustainable development.

Fighting Child Mortality in India – and Winning

Rabi and Abhay reduced infant mortality by 75 percent in Gadchiroli, in rural India, in only 15 years. This project explores how they did it, what the impact of their project is and whether it can be exported.

Enough! Women Fighting Violence Against Women Together in Unique Ways

Women are banding together to fight inequality, sexual harassment and violence using vigilantism, digital technology and even founding women’s only villages. These stories find out how these groups work and how effective they are.

Can the Money of the Future Make Poverty an Issue of the Past?

​Can the money of the future make poverty an issue of the past? This story delves into the question how mobile money is changing the ways individuals spend, save, trade and exchange in developing countries.

Kivu: Microcredits Adrift

Video journalist Pacom Bagula has dedicated much of his research to women entrepreneurs in eastern DRC who have built successful businesses with microcredits. Through feature-length and web documentaries, this project tells his story.